Archive for Wolverine

What do Mickey Mouse and Wolverine have in common? Ownership, apparently…

Posted in Comics, Marvel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 31st August, 2009 by Adam Redsell

Yes, your heard that right.  Disney is now the proud owner of Marvel Comics.

The Walt Disney Company announced yesterday that Marvel shareholders would receive $30 per share in cash plus 0.745 Disney shares for each Marvel share owned in a transaction totaling approximately $4 billion.

What does this mean for you, dear Comics Reader?  Well, not a whole lot up front actually.  Disney seems intent on honouring all existing agreements, and allowing Marvel to retain its corporate identity; similar in fashion to the Time-Warner/DC Comics dynamic.  So we should see Marvel retain a large degree of editorial control.

But that doesn’t mean they don’t have plans.  After all, why else would Disney buy Marvel if not for the characters?  Disney President Robert A. Iger, had this to say:

“This transaction combines Marvel’s strong global brand and world-renowned library of characters including Iron Man, Spider-Man, X-Men, Captain America, Fantastic Four and Thor with Disney’s creative skills, unparalleled global portfolio of entertainment properties, and a business structure that maximizes the value of creative properties across multiple platforms and territories”

Marvel Chief Executive Ike Perlmutter read between the lines as well:

“Disney is the perfect home for Marvel’s fantastic library of characters given its proven ability to expand content creation and licensing businesses.”

Can anyone say “crossover”?  We may not see Donald Duck meet Deadpool anytime soon, but it sounds like both companies are eager for the chance to play with each other’s toys.

Entertainment media outlets have been spitballing the possibilities, from Lost and Pirates of the Carribean comics to animated superhero features.  More ridiculous propositions include a Kingdom Hearts comic and a Spider-Man/Mickey team-up.  Either way, we should see distribution channels open up for the comics giant, and hopefully for the industry at large.

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Deadpool is Green Lantern…Wai–Wha?!

Posted in Comics, DC, Deadpool, film, Green Lantern, Marvel with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 27th July, 2009 by Adam Redsell
Ryan Reynolds is Deadpool, is Green Lantern?

Ryan Reynolds is Deadpool, is Green Lantern?

I was more than shocked to read in passing that ‘[Geoff] Johns is really excited about Ryan Reynolds as GL.’ This was during the Blackest Night panel at the San Diego Comic-Con. While I’m sure Geoff Johns was just being polite and towing the company line, DC (or should I say, Warner Bros.?) must be stark, raving mad to sign an actor connected with not just one, but two sword-slinging, smart-mouthed Marvel properties, to portray their now-flagship character, Hal Jordan, the Green Lantern. I am of course referring to Reynolds’ turn as Hannibal King of Blade fame, but more importantly, to his recent role as Deadpool in the Wolverine film (soon to be reprised in a central, starring capacity).

I couldn’t tell you how many hits Bat-Shark Repellent receives on a daily basis, from Google searches on “deadpool”, “deadpool movie”, and “deadpool ryan reynolds” [sic], but I can tell you it’s a lot.  I can tell you first hand that there is a lot of interest surrounding Ryan Reynolds’ Deadpool film, and despite Marvel’s mishandling of the character in Wolverine‘s final act, their interest is well-placed.  Reynolds’ nailed the ‘Merc with a Mouth’ aspect of the character, with a lithe, muscular physique to boot.  He’s perfect for the part.

But not for Green Lantern.  Hal Jordan is a straight-shooter with a carefree abandon, but he’s not a smartass.  Not to Ryan Reynolds levels, he isn’t.  Hal Jordan’s wit and charm hearken back to the James Deans and the Steve McQueens of the day – the ‘Rat Pack’, not the ‘Brat Pack’.  In fact, I was watching The Great Escape the other day, and Hal Jordan is exactly like Steve McQueen.  He dislikes authority; he plays by his own rules; and he can’t be couped up because he wants to be free, no matter the cost.  So in the absence of Steve McQueen, WB should be signing someone like him.

Witty one-liners are the skill of the superhero – more important than flying or super-strength – but there are different brands of wit, and I’m sorry, but Reynolds just doesn’t have Hal Jordan’s.  But hey, what do I know?  This is Hollywood we’re talking about here, and I very much doubt that Warner Bros. concern themselves with stuff like this.  No-one outside of Comicdom really knows Hal Jordan, so they’re likely thinking of him as a blank slate – not a sacred cow like Batman or Superman.  The pitch probably went something like this: “think Wolverine meets Superman” and BAMMO! “Get Ryan Reynolds’ agent on the phone, pronto!”

Reynolds must love him some comics, as this deal would make him the first actor to portray characters from both Marvel and DC.  He was also attached to play the Flash a few years ago.  Now that I can see, provided they meant the quick-witted Wally West Flash and not the straight-down-the-line Barry Allen Flash.

To my mind – and I’m sure to many others’ – Ryan Reynolds is Deadpool.  Steve McQueen is Green Lantern!  I’ll probably see this film regardless – and I’m sure Warner Bros. know this – more out of morbid curiousity than anything else.  But who knows?  Maybe Reynolds can channel McQueen and all will be right in Sector 2814.  (That’s Earth.)

For my money, this Green Lantern fan’s vision of a film starring Nathan Fillon makes a whole lot more sense:

Wolverine TPB

Posted in Comics, Marvel, Wolverine with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 19th May, 2009 by Adam Redsell
Four parts brilliant to two parts...not-so-brilliant.

Four parts brilliant to two parts...not-so-brilliant.

Author: Chris Claremont
Artist: Frank Miller
Inker: Josef Rubinstein
Colorist: Glynis Wein & Lynn Varley
Letterer: Tom Orzechowski
Editor: Louise Jones
Editor-in-Chief: Jim Shooter
Cover Artist: Frank Miller

Uncanny X-Men 172-173

Artist: Paul Smith
Inker: Bob Wiacek

Much like the recent Wolverine film, I recommend the first two-thirds of this trade paperback for the ideal Wolverine experience.  That is to say that I recommend reading the Wolverine mini-series penned and penciled by Chris Claremont and Frank Miller, and not so much the issues of The Uncanny X-Men that succeed it.  While the additional issues may add to the perceived value of this collection, the drastic shift in tone, plot and pacing diminish the impact of the core 4-part story.  This shift can be attributed to two factors: the absence of Frank Miller, and the presence of the X-Men.

I can only conclude Frank Miller’s heavy involvement in the scripting of Wolverine, as the disparity in Claremont’s writing is striking.  Wolvie’s visceral tale of revenge and honour is not an easy act to follow, but the appearance of the X-Men is crude and garish by comparison.  The super-team feel like a cameo in their own book; an unwanted intrusion into Logan’s story.  I would recommend tracking down the mini-series alone if the price is right.  If this trade paperback is all you can find, then I implore you to stay your curiosity and stop reading when Miller stops drawing.  Not because Miller’s art is that much greater (though it is) – I honestly believe the issues that follow spoil the overall story.  I don’t know if that speaks to Logan’s character as the quintessential lone wolf, but I’ve still seen him operate effectively in well-written X-teams, and unfortunately this is not one of them.  Perhaps Claremont’s ongoing X-Men work was running on a tighter schedule and he was simply phoning it in.  Perhaps sales were flagging in the main book, and Wolverine’s re-introduction really was forced into the story, rather than the other way around.

Rogue’s character is particularly grating, both in dialogue and concept.  Case in point: Rogue casually mentions (in her irritating Southern accent) that she is half-alien, hence her immunity to poisons, and so of course she is the best candidate to help Logan on his mission!  Logan accepts her explanation as a matter of course, and is all of a sudden willing to put all his misgivings about her aside and take her on board(!).  Claremont infers that Wolvie employs good ol’ logical reasoning to arrive at this decision (“Hmmm…half-alien, immune to poisons…I guess you have a point”)!  On the back of a classic Japanese revenge tale, you can probably appreciate that I found this *a little* hard to swallow.  Also present is a pointless cameo of The Phoenix, Scott Summers’ new girlfriend who COINCIDENTALLY LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE JEAN GREY AND COINCIDENTALLY SURVIVED THE VERY SAME PLANE CRASH THAT JEAN GREY DIED IN – but it’s not Jean Grey; it couldn’t possibly be Jean Grey! X-fans curious as to the hallowed origins of Storm’s mohawk will also be pleased to know that its contrivance is explained herein!  See what I mean?  Well, I suppose you won’t until I elaborate on the mini-series itself.

Wolverine is the story of Logan’s battle for the heart of his ex-lover, Mariko.  Three obstacles lie in his path:

  1. Mariko’s father is Shingen Yashida, crimelord extraordinnaire.  His return to Japan necessitates:
  2. Her political marriage to an abusive Yakuza.
    And;
  3. Mariko is Japanese, Wolverine is a Gaijin (basically the n-word for white people, meaning ‘outsider’ or ‘foreigner’).

This means Wolvie has to try extra-hard to prove his worth.  That Lord Shingen is trying to kill him with his elite ninja force doesn’t help any.  To further complicate matters, maverick assassin Yukio also falls for Logan, despite being contracted to kill him.  Yukio proves to be an interesting character, surprisingly free-spirited for someone in the business of taking lives.  Unfortunately, this eccentricity is overplayed in Uncanny X-Men.  (To spare you the torture, Yukio has the dubious honour of inspiring Storm’s mohawk.)

Our (anti-?)hero’s position as an Westerner coming to grips with the Japanese ideology is well-placed from a writing perspective.  It would have been foolishness for Chris Claremont to claim mastery over a foreign culture.  As Claremont’s understanding increases, so too does Logan begin to embrace Japanese concepts of honour and duty.  Having read the very Japanese Ronin and Sin City, I can’t help but wonder whether this could have benefited from even more involvement from Frank Miller.  His artwork is cleaner and more academic than the style he’s become renowned for, but remains distinct and dynamic, especially during action scenes.

Without a doubt, Wolverine’s solo debut is a defining moment for the character.  Even his famous line “I’m the best at what I do” is coined here, but never overused; and the phrase feels fresher for knowing.  This is recommended reading for any comic reader.  Ignore the extras and you’ll be just fine.

A Word of Warning to All Deadpool Fans:

Posted in Comics, Deadpool, film, Marvel, Wolverine, X-Men with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 4th May, 2009 by Adam Redsell

Do NOT see Wolverine. It will piss you right off.

To everyone else: the first two-thirds, then walk away. No malice, no hard feelings, just try to stem your curiousity for thirty seconds and walk calmly out of the cinema. There, that wasn’t so hard, now, was it? And congratulations – you’ve just rewarded yourself with the perfect Wolverine experience.

Protip: if Wolverine is on 'The Island', you've gone too far.

Protip: if Wolverine is on 'The Island', you've gone too far.

You won’t be scarred for life if you don’t (though you may be disappointed), but Deadpool fans WILL.

Fortunately for me, I don’t count myself among their ranks, but I do know that Deadpool is known as the ‘Merc with a Mouth.’ With Stan Lee and Richard Donner executive producing, someone on the set must have known that this would be tantamount to a big, sick joke.

Deadpool: breaking the fourth wall since 1997.

Deadpool: breaking the fourth wall since 1997.

I’m really not exaggerating, but to tell you why would be to spoil the ending which I’m imploring you not to see!

It doesn’t make one iota of sense to me. They hired Ryan Reynolds for the part – lithe, muscular physique, and a smart mouth; a perfect choice – and for the first half of the movie, he nailed the part perfectly. The only thing missing was the mask, and my guess was that Ryan Reynolds wanted to show off his beautiful face.

Tell me you can't imagine Ryan Reynolds saying that.

Tell me you can't imagine Ryan Reynolds saying that.

You know what? If you can forgive the masklessness, Deadpool fans, just do the same: go and see the first two thirds of the film and you’ll have an enjoyable Wolverine experience with a splash of Deadpool.

(I know it’s in the trailer, but it’s worth going just to see the helicopter bit.)

Marvel may not be on their A-game, but Wolvie’s still the best at what he does (and what he does best is take down helicopters).