Archive for mongul

Blackest Night: Tales of the Corps #1

Posted in Blackest Night, Comics, DC, Green Lantern with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 18th July, 2009 by Adam Redsell
Tales of the <i> <ul>Corpse</ul> <p>: get it?</i>

Tales of the Corpse: get it?

“Tales of the Blue Lantern: Saint Walker”
Author: Geoff Johns
Artist: Jerry Ordway
Colorist: Hi-Fi
Cover Artists: Ed Benes, Rob Hunter & Nei Ruffino
Variant Cover Artists: Dave Gibbons & Alex Sinclair
Letterer: Steve Wands
Editor: Adam Schlagman
“Tales of the Sinestro Corps: Mongul: For Your Love”
Author: Peter J. Tomasi
Artist: Chris Samnee
Colorist: John Kalisz
Letterer: Sal Cipriano
Editor: Adam Schlagman
“Tales of the Indigo Tribe”
Author: Geoff Johns
Artist: Rags Morales
Colorist: Nei Ruffino
Letterer: Steve Wands
Editor: Adam Schlagman

When I read a somewhat negative review of Tales of the Corps this week, I couldn’t wait to disagree with it.  Turns out I got my wish.  I heartily recommend this book to Green Lantern fans, Alan Moore fans, and anyone who wants to read three entertaining stories within 25 pages.  It’s not ‘important’ per se, but it *is* entertaining, and it does flesh out the major players in this War of Light; something that I felt had been glossed over in a rush to get to Blackest Night.

The first story is also the strongest story, which opens where Green Lantern #42 left off.  Saint Walker and the Blue Lanterns are fending off an attack from Larfleeze, also known as Agent Orange, on their spiritual homeworld of Odym.  The opening page is a striking collision of blue and orange, and Jerry Ordway’s clean linework and figure depictions are the best I’ve seen from him in a long time.  In fact, I’d like to see future Green Lantern stories drawn by Ordway based on what I’ve seen here.  In these dire moments, Saint Walker’s life flashes before his eyes, and we get to see his journey to Blue Lanterndom.  I’ve always wondered about Walker’s sainthood, and this story really brings those religious aspects to the forefront.  As you’d expect, this is a story of hope against all adversity.  What you might not expect is the moving tale of a man who clings to Hope despite losing everything.  Saint Walker is a proverbial Job, on a dangerous pilgrimage to save his planet and his people.  Saint Walker emerges as so much more than a one-dimensional Polyanna do-gooder; he becomes an undeniable Beacon of Light – an Andy Dufresne, if you will – a hero for the weak and oppressed.  I’m laying on the superlatives, but the quintessential Blue Lantern has easily become my favourite character in this event; there’s something so refreshing about his Definite Goodness in this time where the Green Lanterns are mired in so much grey.  He reminds me of Optimus Prime; an incorruptible force for Good, who’ll fight to the end for all of us.  Look, just buy the book on the strength of this story alone, okay?

On the flipside, Peter Tomasi dabbles in some black humour, as he’s in the habit of doing.  If you’ve read his Black Adam miniseries, you’ll understand why; if not, allow me to spell it out for you: he’s damn good at it.  His track record with Mongul is also sterling, so the result here is to be expected.  This tale of Mongul’s warped childhood is simultaneously harrowing and amusing.  Chris Samnee’s art is rather simplistic, but well-suited to this “kid’s story” nonetheless.  A young Mongul is bored while his father (also Mongul) is out conquering and subjugating.  He watches some of his father’s exploits on “TV”, fantasising about what it would be like to be his father.  So he dresses up in his father’s gear and plays outside with the skeletons.  Pretty soon he gets exactly what he wished for, but just you wait until dad gets home…

The third and final story is a telling exposition of the heretofore mysterious nature of the Indigo Tribe.  Their untranslated speech gives off the feeling of a foreign film, as Geoff Johns allows the beautiful artwork of Rags Morales to tell the story.  Contrary to what its detractors may tell you, this issue reveals quite a bit about the Tribe’s motivations, and the nature of their powers.  You may not know the names of their people or their planet, but by the end you’ll be asking yourself, “what’s in a name, really?

There’s a lot of variety in the breadth of these stories, and all in all, it’s a very entertaining romp through Geoff Johns’ “emotional spectrum”.  If you miss Alan Moore’s Tales of the Green Lantern Corps, you’re in luck; because you’ve just found its spiritual successor.

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Green Lantern Corps #36

Posted in Comics, DC, Green Lantern with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 21st May, 2009 by Adam Redsell
A temporary lapse in judgement.

A temporary lapse in judgement.

“Emerald Eclipse: Part Four”
Author: Peter J. Tomasi
Artist: Patrick Gleason
Inkers: Rebecca Buchman & Prentis Rollins
Colorist: Randy Mayor
Cover Artists: Gleason, Buchman & Mayor
Alternate Cover Artist: Rodolfo Migliari
Letterer: Steve Wands
Editor: Adam Schlagman

I’ll level with you: I was more than a little disappointed with this issue of Green Lantern Corps.  And that’s a little more complimentary than it sounds at first.  See, I’ve come to expect a high level of quality out of both Green Lantern titles, because they’ve been the most consistent books on the shelves for quite some time.  Unfortunately, this particular issue is *not too bad* as opposed to ‘good’ or ‘great’ – a temporary lapse in quality, or a slump, if you will.  This is mainly attributable to two things: the flat opening, and inconsistencies in Patrick Gleason’s art.

The opening reveal wasn’t nearly as earth-shattering as it could have been.  It was surprising, but its subsequent explanation felt really contrived and was dryly delivered.  On the back of Tomasi’s emotionally-charged Star Sapphire arc, I found this even more surprising.  The revelations imparted did add yet another dimension to Sinestro’s character – it just lacked the sugar to help the medicine go down.  The issue finishes quite strongly, but his Mongul scenes lacked the visceral punch they usually have.  Tomasi practically built Mongul into the menace he is today, but on this occasion he felt kind of…soft.  All is not lost, though – there are still some good lines to be had from both Sinestro and Mongul.

The Great Prison Break on Oa was strangely scripted as well.  There was a voiceover of sorts echoing through the halls of the Sciencells, but it was unclear as to who was speaking.  Was it a computer?  Was it a Guardian?  Was it the power battery?  I couldn’t tell, but who/whatever it was, that speech was a little kooky.

Probably the biggest letdown was Patrick Gleason’s art, though.  Gleason is usually very solid, consistent, and adept at drawing action scenes.  This time faces morphed from panel to panel, and details were fudged in big action sequences.  I should mention that this doesn’t happen in every panel – some panels are up to scratch – there’s just noticeable dips in quality quite frequently.

There is a light at the end of the tunnel, though, and that is the battle on Daxam between Sodam Yat (Ion) and Sinestro Corps usurper Mongul.  Sodam Yat’s character gets stronger and stronger with each appearance – you may remember him kicking ass in Legion of 3 Worlds recently – and I’m happy to report he kicks ass again here.  Think Goku’s Spirit Bomb in Dragonball and you should have an idea of the gravity of this sequence.

Ultimately this feels like an important Green Lantern story.  It’s just a pity that the execution was kind of lacking this time.

Blackest Night #0

Posted in Comics, Green Lantern with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 2nd May, 2009 by Adam Redsell
Pretty bright for the "Blackest Night", huh?

Pretty bright for the 'Blackest Night', huh?

Author: Geoff Johns
Artists: Ivan Reis & Doug Mahnke

Now I’m all agitated.  Moving in my seat.  Blackest Night #0, is a real tease, so mission accomplished.  It’s probably the most cleverly disguised ad since DC Universe #0.  Oh, and it’s free, so I can pretty much recommend it to you straight away.  For one solitary day in the year, it’s costing DC money for you to read a comic, so make the most of it.

The cover art’s pretty nice – it’s just a pity they had to put that garish ‘FREE COMIC BOOK DAY’ at the top, and the ugly blank white rectangle in the bottom right corner reminding us that yes, again, it is free.  Not all the free comics today were uglified in this manner, but all the DC ones were.  It even has a barcode – I don’t quite understand that.  Why take stock of a free item?  Anyway, it’s free.

This issue consists of a story snippet with art by Ivan Reis, a letter from Geoff Johns, and some profile pages with art by Doug Mahnke.  The story is deftly scribed by Geoff Johns as always, and Ivan Reis’ art is (somewhat) spectacular as always.  It’s a little bit subdued (hence the ‘somewhat’), because obviously it’s a prologue and no real action.  The story opens as always with a narrative caption from Hal Jordan telling us that he’s an officer of the Green Lantern Corps and that Space Sector 2814 is his space-cop beat.  (Hey Johns, can you quit doing that?  I know you’ve got a lot of new readers picking this up because it’s Blackest Night and it’s free and all, but I also know that you’ll do it again, and I’ve read that damn caption on a monthly basis for the last four years!  We KNOW who he is, we KNOW he’s Green Lantern – that’s why he’s GLOWING GREEN in a GREEN UNIFORM with a GREEN RING, and that’s why we bought a comic with ‘GREEN LANTERN’ on the cover!)  From here, it becomes pretty clear who Johns intends to resurrect for this mega-event.  I’ll give you a hint: the entire issue plays out in Gotham Cemetery.  How doubly appropriate.

Rise from your Grave!

Rise from your Grave!

(I also figured out a couple of weeks ago that Earth-2 Superman would be a resurrect-ee, thanks to the tactless ad for the Blackest Night action figures, which also features in this issue.  This begs the (loaded) question, with all these superheroes rising from the dead all zombie-like, will they be full-blown villains, and if so, is that desecration?  I can’t imagine Geoff Johns desecrating any superhero, much less the likes of Batman, Aquaman, or even Martian Manhunter.  Tell you what, I’ll just assume there’s more to it and we’ll move on, ‘kay?)

Hal Jordan and Barry Allen (the second Flash) have a pleasant little chat over a gravestone, discussing their respective deaths, which is all very strange to this mortal reader.  (Is there any major DC superhero that hasn’t died?  I think Wonder Woman may be the only one, and she’s kind of…arbitrarily major.)  Something sinister is going on in the background (literally), though, of course.  It’s a cemetery at night, what did you expect?  The ending is pretty te[ase]rrific.

A letter from the man himself follows explaining how he wanted to tell this story from the get-go and it wasn’t really intended to be an ‘event’ as such, and you know what?  I believe him – I’m just not sure DC does.  I re-read his Lantern run a few months back, and there’s plenty of foreshadowing going on back there (one could argue it goes back as far as Alan Moore).   It sounds like Geoff’s trying to assure people that this thing won’t run away from him, that it’s still his story, and still under his control.  And I *sort of* believe him.  The checklist on the back page kind of contradicts this a little – 6 titles a month – but still, it’s not exactly Tie-in City.

The profile pages are nice and pretty, and serve as little fact files on each of the Corps.  Does anyone honestly believe that indigo is a legitimate colour, much less an important stripe of the rainbow?  Between the Blue Lanterns’ hope and the Star Sapphires’ love, I can’t even begin to imagine how Johns will squeeze this Indigo Tribe (compassion) between the two and give them an actual purpose.  (It’s the only group in this war of light that hasn’t been revealed yet, so I guess I’ll just assume again, shall I?)  Each Corps’ profile details their represented emotion, homeworld, history, powers and weaknesses.  I wonder if this is the kind of thing Johns used to pitch the idea to DC originally.  Probably they just handed him the keys to the city after Rebirth and he didn’t need to pitch it at all.  Nerds will have fun trying to recognise all of the arms reaching out of the ground on the Black Lantern page.

Mongul, where are you?

Mongul, where are you?

Anyway, very informative, but there were a couple of niggling things.  One being the omission of Mongul from the Sinestro Corps page.  I wonder what that means, or was I not paying attention somewhere?  Well, Mongul’s cool and he should be in the Corps.  The other thing being how damn mathematical all the weaknesses are.  They have ‘rules’ that remind me of schoolyard fare: ‘the orange rings can’t drain the blue rings, and the blue rings beat the red rings, but the blue rings don’t work unless they’re with the green rings, and the yellow rings beat the green rings, but not the blue rings.’  And I’m the king of the castle and you’re the dirty rascal.

Like I said, though, I assume there’s more to it.  Did I mention it’s free?