Archive for Booster Gold

Shameless Plug: My Massive Comics Fire Sale

Posted in Comics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 25th October, 2009 by Adam Redsell

Everything must go!

Everything must go!

I know – this isn’t very professional – but nobody pays me to do this, so I’m going to do it anyway!  I’m moving house very shortly, and that means I have a lot of possessions I need to off-load.  Sadly, that includes a massive pile of comic books.  Naturally, I’m selling them on eBay, and now I’m flogging them off to you, Dear Reader.  Oh, and there’s also a Super Mario Galaxy Strategy Guide if you need as well…Here’s a list:

1 0

AU $14.99

9d 20h
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AU $0.99

9d 16h
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AU $1.99

9d 16h
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AU $0.99

9d 17h
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AU $0.99

9d 17h
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AU $23.99

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AU $0.99

9d 18h
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AU $1.99

9d 18h
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AU $0.99

9d 18h
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AU $1.99

9d 18h
BOOSTER GOLD #13 Comic (DC Comics)

Postage cost: AU $2.50
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AU $0.99

9d 19h
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AU $6.99

9d 19h
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AU $5.99

9d 20h
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AU $2.99

9d 20h
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AU $1.99

9d 20h
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AU $1.99

9d 21h
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AU $1.20

9d 21h
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AU $0.99

9d 21h
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AU $0.99

9d 21h
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AU $2.99

9d 21h
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AU $0.99

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AU $8.99

9d 22h
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AU $0.99

9d 22h
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AU $4.50

9d 22h
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AU $0.99

9d 23h
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AU $3.50

9d 23h
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AU $3.60

9d 23h
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AU $6.99

9d 23h
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AU $0.99

9d 23h

Just click the links if you’re interested!  And even if you’re not, have a bid anyway – consider it a small donation if you’ve been enjoying the site thus far.

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Final Crisis Aftermath: Dance #1 (of 6)

Posted in Comics, DC, Final Crisis with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 29th May, 2009 by Adam Redsell
Snap, crackle, Pop!

Snap, crackle, Pop!

“This Is How We Do It”
Author: Joe Casey
Artist: ChrisCross
Inkers: Rob Stull, with Mick Gray, Wayne Faucher, & ChrisCross
Colorist: Snakebite
Letterer: Sal Cipriano
Editors: Eddie Berganza, Rex Ogle & Ian Sattler
Cover Artist: Stanley “Art Germ” Lau

Finally! A new DC book I can get excited about!  Final Crisis Aftermath: Dance may as well be named Super Young Team because that’s what it is: a new comic mini-series starring those upstart Japanese superheroes we saw too little of (and loved) in Final Crisis.

For the record, I think it’s great that DC is experimenting with new books and ideas like these in a time of financial uncertainty.  The trade off, of course, is the title, but who cares when a book is as good as this?  The artist is called ChrisCross as well – what’s with that?  Again, it doesn’t matter, because his pencils are hot; they’re manic and clean; they crackle and fizz with sci-fi and J-Pop and…honour – all of those things that a Japanese super-team needs.

That’s kind of what this book is about.  The Super Young Team – Most Excellent Superbat, Big Atomic Lantern Boy, Shiny Happy Aquazon, Shy Crazy Lolita Canary, and Well-Spoken Sonic Lightning Flash – post-Crisis find themselves on a satellite surrounded by hot-shots and PR people trying to groom them into the next sensation.  The satellite is to be their new headquarters, it seems.  They have ice sculptures and sushi platters in their meeting room, and a trophy room full of conquests they never made.  They have a rave party with the Paris Hiltons and various other good-fer-nothin’s to kick things off, all the while wondering aloud if this is really what this superhero biz-o is all about.  A personal highlight for me: the Most Excellent Superbat receives a visitation from the ghost of the late great Ultimon, who harshly admonishes him for dishonouring the proud traditions of superheroism.  By now the youngsters grow restless for action, and they want to see what’s happened to Japan behind the curtains and levers.

The beckoning of the Ancient amidst the noise of Pop so perfectly encapsulates Japanese culture and the Meiji Restoration conflict that it’s hard to imagine it was written by a non-Japanese.  Joe Casey has completely nailed the concepts, the focus, and the dialogue – all of it has an unmistakable Japanese-ness, and all of it is supremely entertaining.  The Most Excellent Superbat’s internal monologue appears in the form of ‘Twitterati’ posts (‘@MosExBat about 2 seconds ago’) – a great new spin on the caption box.

My God, did I mention that the colours are gorgeous?  Neon yellows, pinks, greens, and metallic blue.  This is the sexiest comic I’ve laid eyes on for a while.

The whole thing feels like a jaunt through the mind of Grant Morrison, which is great (and always a privelege), because he devised this team for Final Crisis, obviously with the intention of someone running with them later.  Thing is, Dance has all the verve and modernity of Morrison – the same energy that propelled Metal Men and Booster Gold – and yet, I can’t imagine this being any better had Morrison himself written it.  (Morrison this, Morrison that; Morrison, Morrison, Morrison – why don’t I just marry the guy already?) Joe Casey may not be Grant Morrison, but you know what they say: “a rose by any other name…”

Booster Gold #20

Posted in Booster Gold, Comics, DC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 26th May, 2009 by Adam Redsell
You'd be surpised how few Commies are actually in this.

You'd be surprised how few Commies are actually in this.

“1952 Pickup”
Author: Keith Giffen
Artists: Patrick Oliffe & Dan Jurgens
Inkers: Norm Rapmund & Rodney Ramos
Colorist: Hi-Fi
Letterer: Sal Cipriano
Assistant Editor: Harvey Richards
Editor: Michael Siglain
Cover Artist: Jurgens & Rapmund

I stopped reading Booster Gold after lucky issue 13.  That’s two issues after Geoff Johns left the book, which yielded a noticeable drop in quality.  All the while Dan Jurgens continued to draw Booster – which was great, seeing as he created the character – but writing duties were passed to less accomplished writers, and at one point, Jurgens had to draw and write.  I thought it was only a matter of time before this once illustrious series got the axe.  Not yet, it seems.

When I noticed Keith Giffen’s name credited on the front cover (along with Jurgens’) of issue 20, I decided now might be the right time to climb back into the chronosphere with Booster Gold and Rip Hunter.  After all, Giffen has quite a pedigree when it comes to Booster Gold.  Booster was in Giffen’s hilarious incarnation of the Justice League.  Giffen also did the page breakdowns for my favourite ‘event’ comic, 52, in which Booster was a major character.  But most importantly, Giffen has a reputation for witty dialogue.

He doesn’t disappoint in that regard – Booster’s a smartass as always and Rip’s a time-wearied cynic as expected – although I was missing the presence of his robotic encyclopaedia, Skeets (perhaps there wasn’t room for three smartasses in Giffen’s story).  When I stopped reading the title, Booster’s sister had just joined the crew, which was an interesting development, so it was sad to see that she had already been dispensed with (or maybe she’s just on an adventure with Skeets).  The issue kicks off with an amusing verbal skirmish between Booster and Rip,

In Booster Gold #20, Rip’s time machine stalls ‘somewhere to the left of yesterday’, and Booster decides to pass the time by visiting the [relatively] peaceful 50s.  He, of course, gets more than he bargains for when he journeys to 1952.  Hoping for Las Vegas, he lands instead in the Nevada desert, near the small town of Mosely, population 265, but more importantly, near a top-secret rocket launch site.  Booster, oblivious to the ‘anti-cape’ laws of the time, flies to the nearest servo [Americans read: gas station] for directions to Sin City.  What he gets instead is the ‘FBI’, who actually turn out to be none other than Sergeant Rock and the Suicide Squad.  They blackmail Booster into stopping one of the world’s first manned space flights, because the project is headed by a deep cover Soviet scientist.  Booster is happy to oblige when he realises the first successful manned space flight wasn’t to occur until a decade later.  Everybody wins.  (This, of course, leads to some witty banter between Booster and Sgt. Rock.)

This issue was pretty entertaining.  Probably the biggest disappointment was the guest art by Patrick Oliffe.  It’s not bad per se, but the characters’ faces lacked detail at times, and Jurgens’ Booster just can’t be matched.  It probably would have fared better had the issue not been book-ended by Dan Jurgens’ illustrations.  It just lacked consistency given the differences in style and ability.  Of course, I would have preferred that Jurgens drew the whole thing, but obviously there were time constraints there.

When all is said and done, Booster #20 is a simple, yet enjoyable one-shot.  Whether or not you’ll enjoy this issue is wholly dependent on what you value most in a comic book – the writing, which is great, or the art, which is good in places, and merely *okay* in others.  If you enjoy Keith Giffen’s ear for dialogue and *a spot of* Dan Jurgens’ art, then by all means, have a read.